Self Administered Soft Tissue Release of the Posterior Deltoid using a Tennis Ball

Often you’ll find that the posterior deltoid muscles, along with the external rotators (infraspinatus / theres minor) form adhesions and myofacial trigger points. This will cause dysfunction within the shoulder mechanics, resulting in pain and discomfort.

A great way to release this tension, trigger points and pain is to use a tennis ball.

Perform the posterior deltoid release technique for 2 – 3 minutes working all the soft tissue around the shoulder, hold on any areas of tenderness for about 30 seconds or until you feel a release and then move onto the next area.

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Alex Eatly
Dr Alex Eatly is a Sports Chiropractor holding a Masters of Chiropractic from The Welsh Institute of Chiropractic. Recognised as one of the premier chiropractors in the North West, Alex has established a reputation for fast effective pain relief, injury rehabilitation and performance enhancement by combining not only Chiropractic but also his experience and knowledge in Physiotherapy, Sports Injury Therapy, Dry Needling (Acupuncture), Active Release Techniques, Personal Training, Strength and Conditioning, Functional Movement Screening, Instrumented Soft Tissue Mobilisation and Sports Injury Rehabilitation.
Alex Eatly
Alex Eatly

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About Alex Eatly

Dr Alex Eatly is a Sports Chiropractor holding a Masters of Chiropractic from The Welsh Institute of Chiropractic. Recognised as one of the premier chiropractors in the North West, Alex has established a reputation for fast effective pain relief, injury rehabilitation and performance enhancement by combining not only Chiropractic but also his experience and knowledge in Physiotherapy, Sports Injury Therapy, Dry Needling (Acupuncture), Active Release Techniques, Personal Training, Strength and Conditioning, Functional Movement Screening, Instrumented Soft Tissue Mobilisation and Sports Injury Rehabilitation.

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