ITBS (Iliotibial Band Syndrome) is a common overuse  injury occurring in many athletes especially runners. The condition is characterised by irritation and  inflammation of the ITB present in the outer side of thigh region from hip to knee.

 

ITB

 

About the Iliotibial band

The ITB is a thick and fibrous band that extends from iliac crest of the pelvic bone to the outer or lateral side of the tibia in your lower leg. The gluten and TFL muscles attached to this band. The main function of the band is muscle coordination and joint stabilisation during walking and running.

When the leg is in extended, the band is placed at the anterior (front) of the Hip, (greater trochanter). When knee flexes the band moves over the hip to the posterior (back) of the hip. There is a fluid filed sac (bursa) in this region to help reduce friction on the ITB.

Causes of ITB Syndrome
• Over training / Training involving high amounts of flexion and extension of the hips)
• Over Pronation of the Feet (Flat Feet)
• Muscle Imbalances (Glute Weakness / Weak Foot Inverters / Tight TFL / Tight Adductors / Tight Peroneus / Tight Hamstring / Tight Quadriceps)
• Poor Shock Absorption (poor design or quality of trainers)
• Poor Core Stability and Pelvic Alignment
• Hills / Hard Surfaces / Uneven Ground
The syndrome is more common in women due to women having wider hips than men.
Signs and Symptoms
Symptoms typically are characterised by:
• Lateral Knee Pain especially during activity
• Increased pain when going downhill
• Increased Pain in forward swing of leg during walking / movement
• Possible snapping or clicking sensation in knee or hip
• Pain on outside of thigh
• Abduction Weakness of hips may occur

Treatment of ITB Syndrome

Treatment
Initially: Apply Ice to the area to help control inflammation and decrease pain.  20 minutes on 1 hour off repeated 3-4 times. over the next few days. Avoid aggravating activities while allowing ITB to heal.

Full Chiropractic Assessment:

This will help determine the likely origin of you pain and discomfort. You will receive a full Orthopaedic, Neurological and biomechanics assessment. Depending on the findings you will likely receive a combination of the following:

• Chiropractic Adjustments to realign the spine and pelvis.
• Soft Tissue Techniques including Massage, Trigger Point Therapy, Active Release Techniques and Acupuncture to relax surrounding musculature, release tension, help realign pelvis and reduce pain and discomfort.
• Stretching Exercises
• Core Stability and Corrective Exercises
• Mobility Exercises to help the function of the SI Joints.
• Lifestyle and Exercise Advice.

Also check Out This Video:
Click Here –>>>       *** Runners Knee – Treatment Guide to Runners Knee ***      <<<– Click Here

 

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Alex Eatly
Dr Alex Eatly is a Sports Chiropractor holding a Masters of Chiropractic from The Welsh Institute of Chiropractic. Recognised as one of the premier chiropractors in the North West, Alex has established a reputation for fast effective pain relief, injury rehabilitation and performance enhancement by combining not only Chiropractic but also his experience and knowledge in Physiotherapy, Sports Injury Therapy, Dry Needling (Acupuncture), Active Release Techniques, Personal Training, Strength and Conditioning, Functional Movement Screening, Instrumented Soft Tissue Mobilisation and Sports Injury Rehabilitation.
Alex Eatly
Alex Eatly

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About Alex Eatly

Dr Alex Eatly is a Sports Chiropractor holding a Masters of Chiropractic from The Welsh Institute of Chiropractic. Recognised as one of the premier chiropractors in the North West, Alex has established a reputation for fast effective pain relief, injury rehabilitation and performance enhancement by combining not only Chiropractic but also his experience and knowledge in Physiotherapy, Sports Injury Therapy, Dry Needling (Acupuncture), Active Release Techniques, Personal Training, Strength and Conditioning, Functional Movement Screening, Instrumented Soft Tissue Mobilisation and Sports Injury Rehabilitation.

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